buggalcrafts

Crafts from my heart to yours!

Archive for the category “Pre-school”

Craft Stick Snowman Ornament


005Craft Stick Snowman Ornament

In my e-mail this week was an awesome project from Crafts By Amanda that I just HAD to try right away – – –   Paint Stick Snowmen.  As you can tell by my title (and because I’m me) I made some changes.  I think both projects look great and what I love the best about crafting is the fact that you can take a pattern or tutorial and do something a little bit different and personalize the project.  It impresses me that there are just so many ways to go when you first look at a project.

I didn’t do a photo tutorial but this is a simple fairly straight forward project.  Take a look at Amanda’s tutorial if you get lost.

These would look great on a seasonal tree in January. I see white bark and white lights.

Materials

  • Craft sticks
  • Homespun fabric
  • Embroidery thread
  • Whole peppercorns
  • Mini buttons
  • Toothpicks
  • Snow scene “fabric” or quilt batting

Also Needed

  • White craft glue
  • Bamboo skewer
  • Orange marker
  • White paint

Instructions

  1. Paint the craft sticks white and allow them to dry.  I used two coats.  On some of the sticks I use some white fine glitter paint over the last coat to add some sparkle to the ornaments.  I’d recommend 2 coats of this for maximum effect!
  2. Break off about a third of the toothpick.  Then color it orange with the permanent marker.  This is much easier than getting the paint out and making a mess!  I also like Amanda’s idea of using an orange toothpick and I have some colored toothpick on-hand but wouldn’t you know it there are no orange ones!
  3. Cut a 2 inch by 2 inch square from the material.  I like the way homespun fabric drapes and how flannel looks but you can use any you have on hand.
  4. Glue the square to the top of the craft stick to make the hat.  See Amanda’s excellent tutorial for how to do this.  I found that doublestick tape works really well for attaching the fabric when you are doing a bunch – and it eliminates drying time!   But when you tie off the hat with the embroidery thread leave long tail ends and tie them in a knot so you will have a hanger.  I forgot to do that with mine so will have to go back and attach a loop.
  5. Cut a one half inch strip of the snow “fabric” and glue it to the bottom of the cap.  Then trim the end off.
  6. See Amanda tutorial and read the comments for some additional hat ideas.
  7. Cut (or tear) a one inch strip of homespun fabric for the scarf.  Tie it around the snowman’s “neck” and then fringe the ends.  How long you want your scarf is up to you.  I prefer a short scarf.
  8. Apply 2 dots of glue with the bamboo skewer for the eyes (cut the sharp tip off if kids are doing this project) and then glue on two peppercorns.
  9. Apply a line of glue for the nose and glue down the orange toothpick piece to finish the carrot nose.  You could also cut a nose out of orange craft foam.
  10. Apply 5 dots of glue for the mouth and glue down 5 peppercorns.
  11. Glue 2 or 3 mini buttons on the snowman’s “body”.
  12. Let dry completely and the hang on the tree.

Thanks so much for taking a look.  I love to hear your comments! 

Buggalcrafts a.k.a. melba

Christmas Cards for Your Kids to Make!


Christmas Cards for Your Kids to Make!

 If your kids are like mine they love to give gifts but buying gifts for EVERYONE on your little person’s list (from grandma to the dog to the man in the moon) is impossible unless you are independently wealthy!  If you are then stop reading this and immediately wire me a couple of million (lol)! 

I always took my kids to a dollar store (the one’s where everything is literally a dollar) when they were younger to buy their gifts.  But the usefulness and quality of the selections leave a little to be desired and after all – how many coffee mugs and “dust collectors” can one person use?

So, why not make a gift card that will last longer than the gift?  If you have punches grab some wrapping paper, construction paper, glue, gift ribbon, buttons, yarn, etc.  If you don’t have any punch outs you can acquire some punch outs on eBay or Listia.

This craft project costs you nothing but time to make the punch outs as you simply use materials like construction and wrapping paper and glue sticks – which every prudent mother has on-hand.  I also like this craft project because it saves bits and pieces of paper (i.e.; the wrapping paper scraps) and crafting materials (ribbon “snips”, stray rhinestones, etc.) from the trash.   I keep a jar beside my craft desk and I throw those scraps of ribbon, stray rhinestones and buttons, snips of fabric, and such.  And when I am doing a project that requires bits I turn to this jar.

This also makes a great last minute gift (or even a “not-so-last-minute”) when combined with some handmade coupons for a kiss, a hug, 10 minutes of quiet time, clean room, trying a new vegetable, etc.   If you are at a lost on how to get started there are some very good sites out there that will show you how.  Find one on eHow;  “How to Make a Printable Coupon Kids Can Give”And find some great suggestion on what to put on your cards on Kids Love To Know “How to Your Own Coupons Your Parents”.

MATERIALS:

  • Construction or scrapbook Paper
  • Blank note cards (optional)
  • Large envelopes (optional)
  • Stamps (optional)
  • Punches
  • Scissors
  • Glue sticks
  • Markers, gel pen, metallic sharpies, crayons
  • Other Materials: yarn, gift wrap ribbon, rick-rack, sequins, mini pom-poms, “paper” stickers, rhinestones

 INSTRUCTIONS:

  1. Cut or help your child to cut a piece of construction paper in half then fold it to make a card. The cards can be any size but I found a note card size worked best for me.  If making gift cards to attach to presents cut the paper into fourths then fold.
  2. Provide the paper materials to your child.  Help them to make punch outs if needed. 
  3. Save the reverse punches (the “hole” left behind in the paper).  These make some really cute cards.  For example; Punch out a row of evenly spaced hearts (make the first punch, then place the puncher edge touching the right edge of the hole and make the second punch, and so on).  Apply glue “around” the holes and then glue a wrapping paper strip to the paper (design side down so the wrapping paper design shows through the heart shaped holes).  Let dry and then cut the reverse punch strip off.  Glue to the card.
  4. Let your kids decorate the outside of the cards the punches and embellishments.  I have posted photos of some sample cards I made.  Coordinate the cards with the wrapping paper if the card is to be placed on a gift.
  5. Help your kids write a personal message on the inside of the card and then let them sign it.  If you are using a dark color of paper give them a metallic sliver Sharpie or gel marker to do this.  Another option is to cut pieces of light colored construction paper slightly smaller than the card and glue it on the insides of the cards.  Either write on it before your child glues it or allow the glue to dry before writing the message.
  6. Finish the card off perfectly with a stamp or sticker won the back.  Or simply write something like “Buggal Cards” or “Made especially for you by Buggal”.
  7. Wrap the card with gift wrap and then delver it in person or put it in an envelope and mail to the recipient.
  8. Don’t forget to take photos for your scrapbook!

  Thanks so much for taking a look.  I’d LOVE to hear from you!

buggalcrafts

To make a REVERSE PUNCH STRIP, Punch out a row of evenly spaced hearts (make the first punch, then place the puncher edge touching the right edge of the hole and make the second punch, and so on).

To make a REVERSE PUNCH STRIP, Punch out a row of evenly spaced hearts (make the first punch, then place the puncher edge touching the right edge of the hole and make the second punch, and so on).

Apply glue “around” the holes and then glue a wrapping paper strip to the paper (design side down so the wrapping paper design shows through the heart shaped holes).

Apply glue “around” the holes and then glue a wrapping paper strip to the paper (design side down so the wrapping paper design shows through the heart shaped holes).

Let dry and then cut the reverse punch strip off.  Glue to the card.

Let dry and then cut the reverse punch strip off. Glue to the card.

Glue the strip to the card.

Glue the strip to the card.

Snowflake Card: Save those mis-punched snowflakes then glue them to the edges of the card for a complete "snowy" look. I used 3 sizes of snowflake punches.Holly Card:  Run a line of glue across the card in a wavy pattern.  Then glue a piece of yarn to the page.  Let dry and then accent with holly and berries (martha Stewart Holly & Berries punch).  The berries the punch makes are way small so I punch bigger berries with a regular hole punch..

Snowflake Card: Save those mis-punched snowflakes then glue them to the edges of the card for a complete “snowy” look. I used 3 sizes of snowflake punches.
Holly Card: Run a line of glue across the card in a wavy pattern. Then glue a piece of yarn to the page. Let dry and then accent with holly and berries (martha Stewart Holly & Berries punch). The berries the punch makes are way small so I punch bigger berries with a regular hole punch..

Flower Card:  Use rick-rack or use a zig-zag punch (EK Sucess) to make paper rick-rack for the stems.  I used a comos punch to punch a flower from red construction paper and red gingham wrapping paper.  Glue them together and glue a 1/2 inch round punch as the center.  Glue to card and when dry bend the petal up to create a 3D effect.Present Card:  Simply glue ribbon in a criss-cross pattern and then use a jumbo Recollections tag punch to make a tag.  Write a message on the tag and you're done!.

Flower Card: Use rick-rack or use a zig-zag punch (EK Sucess) to make paper rick-rack for the stems. I used a comos punch to punch a flower from red construction paper and red gingham wrapping paper. Glue them together and glue a 1/2 inch round punch as the center. Glue to card and when dry bend the petal up to create a 3D effect.
Present Card: Simply glue ribbon in a criss-cross pattern and then use a jumbo Recollections tag punch to make a tag. Write a message on the tag and you’re done!.

Gingerbread Cameo:  Glue a strip of ribbon to the card.  I save the tail end scraps of ribbon rolls for this purpose.  Glue a 2 inch cameo (EK Sucess) in the center of the card.  Then glue a punch or place a sticker in the cameo.Snowman Card:  I used a McGill snoman punch to make these snowmen but you could just as easily use nesting cirle punches and stack them.  Draw on the features and arms with markers.

Gingerbread Cameo: Glue a strip of ribbon to the card. I save the tail end scraps of ribbon rolls for this purpose. Glue a 2 inch cameo (EK Sucess) in the center of the card. Then glue a punch or place a sticker in the cameo.
Snowman Card: I used a McGill snoman punch to make these snowmen but you could just as easily use nesting cirle punches and stack them. Draw on the features and arms with markers.

"Candy

 

Paper Plate Pumpkin Scarecrow


Paper Plate Pumpkin Scarecrow

Here is a craft idea for those who have a need to do a fall craft project with multiple children.

Oriental Trading sells these kits for decorating a “Scarecrow Pumpkin”.  The unit has three different designs.  Look in the “less than perfect” section and you can get 12 kits for about $2 and SHIPPING IS FREE thru this THURSDAY for any size order!!!   Enter key code WCE3585 during checkout.    If you buy these clearance kits you may need to use your own glue as the adhesive may be dried out – but hey, for $2/12 I can use my glue!!!

Instead of using a pumpkin I purchased dinner size orange paper plates at Wally World I think 20 for $2.  You could also use yellow or buff paper plates to make him more scarcrow-y and less pumpkin-y.

Attach a hanger to the back – glue on a soda pop ring a loop of ribbon or other hanger to the back so he can be hung as a cute handmade by your kid fall decoration!!!

I added the button and wouldn’t he look cute with an addition of buttons on his eyes?  You could also add silk fall leaves, foam fall leaves, and other fall-ly craft items to make your plate unique!

So this works out to be a pretty cheap project for a children’s group to do.  And if you just need to make one project you can hand cut your pieces from craft foam or construction paper!

Until next time!

buggalcrafts a.k.a. melba

Site Recommendation: Step By Step – Gingerbread Theme Crafts & Activities for Children


Site Recommendation: Step By Step – Gingerbread Theme Crafts & Activities for Children

 

Gingerbread is a sweet that can take the form of a cookie or a cake in which the predomiant flavor is ginger.

I’ve visited this site by Janna several times and it popped up again in a recent search so I just have to share it with you.

It appears to no longer be active but there is so much FANTASTIC INFO here that it’s a shame not to use it!

While there is a lot of great information on the day-to-day operation of a daycare  the pages that caught my eye are the great pre-schooler arts & crafts project.  And you already KNOW how I love anything to do with cookies and the like, so the pages  that jumped right out at me were the Gingerbread Theme “fun stuff to do” pages!

What will you find on these three pages? More fun stuff than you can shake a stick cupcake at.  Here’s a brief rundown of the catagories of information shared there.

  • arts & craft projects,
  • books,
  • games & actitities,
  • links,
  • recipies,
  • songs,
  • stories,
  • worksheets

Stop by and take a look at all the great gingerbread themed stuff.  I love the “Gingerbread House” card, the gingerbread molding dough, the sandpaper gingerbread candy cane holders, and the tons of links to other sites.

Thanks so much for dropping in.  I hope you stop back again soon.  And as always please leave a comment don’t make me beg for a comment!

buggalcrafts a.k.a. melba

Recycled Triangle Beads: Wooden Candy Corn Pins


Recycled Triangle Beads:  Wooden Candy Corn Pins

Last summer I found these really dated wooden bead belts at a local craft/home decor store for a grand total of twenty five cents each so even though I’d never dream of wearing one (and I am NO fashionista!) I bought several just for the beads.

The round spacer beads I had an instant use for but I held on to the triangular ones for a while because the holes just don’t run the right way to use them as beads.

I really wanted some candy corn look-a-likes for a fall craft idea (more on this later) and after many attempts using paper, foam and felt that just weren’t what I wanted I thought of using the triangular beads from the belts. Even though I eventually decided NOT to use them on my fall door hanging I did use them as Trinity Candy Corn Pins.

I teach the children at the church I attend on Sunday mornings and Wednesday evenings so I have plenty of crafting opportunities and I really like to do crafts that will be kept and used.  Even though I do a lot of “paper and glue” type crafts I am always on the lookout EVERYWHERE I go and with everything I use for FREE AND CHEAP CRAFTING MATERIAL.  And this was just a perfect project for the kids – cheap, quick & easy and hopefully one that will be worn for years!

We put these on a card with a poem to make a great gift (and testimony) for a parent or grandparent.  I am sharing a poem I’ve had practically forever with you.  I have no clue as to the origins of the poem and I have rewritten it several times myself.  If it sounds familiar to anyone I’d love to know the author.  HappyBird’s Crafting Haven also has a slightly different poem (on a really cute bag header), Christian Candy Corn Poem, that is “not copyrighted so others can use and enjoy freely”.

Of course if you have been reading this blog for a while you KNOW I just can’t do a craft without a lesson to go along with it.  Following is the lesson I used to TRY to explain this to for and five year olds.  This is a very simplistic explanation of the Trinity and all the errors are mine, all the things I have right are from God!

TRINITY LESSON FOR CHILDREN

  • “Tonight we are going to discuss one last “icon of fall”.  So far this month we have talked about what we can learn from some of the common things we see in the fall like that just like fall leaves we are all FALLEN and fall short of the glory of God,  how scarecrows can remind us we need not be SCARED for He is with us, that some of the FRUITS we should strive to have are love, joy, peace, longsuffering, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, & self-control, and that we need to let our light SHINE OUT for Jesus just like pumpkins made into jack o’ lanterns.”
  • Start off the discussion by asking a question, “What is your favorite trick-or-treat candy?”  Let the kids name a few types of candy and then direct their attention to CANDY CORN.  “So how is the trinity (the three persons of God) like this piece of candy corn?” Direct the children to see that there are THREE different colors in a SINGLE piece of candy.  “Each of the three colors are different but the all make of the piece of candy corn.  Without any of the colors it’s just not candy corn.”
  • “We talked earlier in this lesson series about the three persons of God and tonight we are going to explore it a little more.  Does anybody remember back to March (around St. Patrick’s Day) when we used ice, water and water vapor to help us understand that there is ONE GOD in THREE PERSONS?”
  • Read the poem and the Bible verse and discuss how each of the persons of God is different but how they are all the same.  Explain that the candy is really not exactly like God the Father, God the Son, and God the Holy Spirit – that it is really a very simple object used to try to explain a very complex being and that we can never really fully understand God because we a human and He is divine but that the simple piece of candy (give the kids each a piece) can HELP us to start to understand Him.  Remind them that this is something we will all spend the rest of our lives trying to understand and that we will only understand it completely when we are in the presence of God.

CANDY CORN TRINITY POEM

YELLOW is for LIGHT that Jesus is.  We find this in John 9:5, NIV; Jesus said: “‘While I am in the world, I am the light of the world.'”

ORANGE is for the SON OF GOD that Jesus is.   We find this in Matthew 3:16, 17; “This is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased.”

WHITE is for HIS WORDS which are so sweet.  We find this in Psalm 119:103; “The sweet taste reminds us of the sweetness of God’s Words!”

Thank you for reading (and I hope enjoying) this tutorial.  If you have any questions or something is not clear, please let me know so that I can improve the tutorial.   

Please take a moment to leave a comment or rate this post. I’d LOVE to hear from you!

Thanks again. 

buggalcrafts a.k.a. melba

Club VBS 2012 – SpaceQuest


Club VBS 2012: SpaceQuest

One of the themes for Vacation Bible School this year is Club VBS: SpaceQuest, an out-of-this-world experience!  It was the theme we used at my church and it was such a BLAST!!!
VBS got here so much quicker than I EVER expected it too – and I was totally NOT READY for it! But fortunately I am not the one in charge – God is!!! He so blessed me for the week and took care of each night – lesson, craft, games, helpers, and all.   And the kids, the helpers, and even me all had a wonderful time!

Here are my versions of the outer space decorating, activity and craft ideas I found on-line.

These would make great rainy day activities or add up to a super-fantastical outer space birthday party!

Moon Shot

My “rocket ship” is a little different than the one I modeled it from.  The only box I had available was not quite tall enough so I had to cut the top part-way off it off, flip it up and reinforce that part with a broken hula-hoop.  Never throw ANYTHING away!  I also added the SpaceQuest logo from the clip-art on LifeWay’s VBS site and put a starry night backdrop behind it. It didn’t turn out looking too terribly bad – from the front that is!!!

Plastic Cup Rocket Launcher

This is so super easy, and SO fun to do!  The kids really loved these.  It’s also very inexpensive and would make a great party game.

Instead of having the kids I taught (age 3) draw a rocket on their own I found calendar “die cuts” of rocket/space shuttles at the local teacher supply store (also a great place to find cheap room or party decorations).  I also found some later at the Dollar Tree for, well, a dollar!  The kids added accents to the space ships with crayons.  They can also add their own “logo” to the ship either with a sticker or crayons.  The “rockets” really look like they are blasting off when you launch them.

If you are going to have the children draw their own rockets use white cardstock.  The “rocket” will stand up better than plain paper with heavy use.

Instead of using a slit in the directions I used the “hole-punch” method described in the comments and found this works GREAT!

I also found astronaut calendar cut-outs which could be taking a “moon walk” instead of blasting off.

Comet Toss

I really love this craft as it is so easy to do and you can go so many ways – our solar system, random planets, moon-scape scene, etc. – AND you can use whatever materials you have on-hand to decorate it!

Luckily I found a big piece of black felt in the Children’s Church Supply Closet and I had some fabric scraps from a DIY “solar system fabric book” that came in a BIG bag of fabric remnants I bought at an estate sale so this was essentially free.

I cut the planets out and glued them to a felt backing with fabric glue for re-enforcement and then glued them to the felt.  Be aware that the balls will not stick to the fabric planets.   As I did not have all the fabric planets and wasn’t too concerned about being accurate I just glued them down randomly.

I also added felt planets and stars cut from felt scraps and to add some “sparkly” added several foam outer space glitter stickers.

I left off the “orbit lines” of the planets for scoring as the kids I taught are 3 years old and I really didn’t want to make it a game where you scored points.

I push-pinned the game to the edge of a bulletin board and let it hang down.  For “asteroids” I used Ping-Pong balls with self-adhesive backed Velcro pieces attached to them.  You really, really need to use adhesive backed Velcro as you just CAN’T easily glue Velcro to plastic balls.

This would also make a great “Pin the Astronaut on the Moon” game.  Glue a large felt moon to black felt and then add a Velcro strip to the back of foam astronaut sticker.   Add craters to the moon with darker grey felt circles.  Further decorate the background with fabric paint and/or felt stars, planets, comets, etc. and of course a U.S. Flag!

It could also be cute to make a super cute Outer Space Scene “rearrange-able puzzle”.  All you need is an 11”x7” inch piece of black felt and felt star, moon, comet, planet, astronaut and space ship “stickers” for the kids to rearrange.  If you are particularly handy you can make a pocket for the “stickers” to reside in. Glue a piece of ribbon on the back of one side of the felt so the space scene can easily be rolled up and secured for transport.

Solar System Canopy

I modeled this after an Oriental Trading Company product I REALLY, REALLY wanted but just couldn’t afford.  I had given up on this idea but a couple of days before VBS I found a bed canopy on sale for less than $10 at Justice.  I had purchased a small glow-in-the-dark solar system model from the Dollar Tree eons ago in the event that one of my kids would need to do a Solar System project in school.  I also found some glow-in-the-dark planets and stars like you would “glue” to the ceiling at you guessed it – the Dollar Tree!

First I pinned them on with safety pins but that just looked “tacky” and there was the (however remotely possibility) safety issue if one of the pins snapped open and stuck one of the kids so I tried sewing them on with a needle and thread but that was taking FOREVER!  So after giving up and moving on to suspending the planets from the top of the canopy some brainstorming I “sewed” them on with FISHING LINE!!!  It worked perfectly and you don’t even need a needle!  Someone I had put glow-in-the-dark stars on the ceiling for a previous VBS probably around 25 years ago.  Can you believe they were still there? So after hanging the canopy from a hook in the ceiling I was all set for a starry night.

WOW, did the kids love this!  They had the best time sitting inside the canopy and counting down to blast off to see the stars – – – and listen to the Bible story.  Just in case I had one child scared of the dark I got some of the battery operated push on lights shaped like stars and moons from my favorite store.  They MAY have liked those more than the stars on the ceiling!

Collecting Moon Rocks

This was another one of the games we played that the kids LOVED.  They had a blast looking for the “hidden” moon rocks.  I used plastic whiffle balls but as my son pointed out moon rocks “aren’t white and don’t have holes in them – that’s pumice!”  He is a little bit of a smart aleck takes after his mom!  Wadded up balls of aluminum foil would work equally as well.  Provide some astronaut gloves (i.e.; adult gardening gloves or leather work gloves) and a “specimen bag” (any type of bags you can find).  Be sure to have the kids do the “moon walk” (i.e.; take big and bouncy steps)!

Decorating on a Shoestring

For some cheap decorations I stopped a local teacher supply store and picked up some solar system posters for a dollar each.  I also found some great bulletin board posters, cut-outs & borders at the Dollar Tree.  I set up the room in stations: Moon Room (Reading), Bible Dress-Up, Mission Central, etc.

For cheap Bible dress-up clothing I asked church members for old t-shirts and scarfs.  Cut the tees down the front, turn them inside out and then tie them with a fabric belt, scarf, sash, or tie.  I also made some belts by braiding some torn t-shirt strips.

Thanks so much for taking time to stop by.  I hope you found an outer space idea or two that suits you.  I’d love to see your space craft projects – either your version of these or a totally new one to me.  Send your photos to me at buggal1989@yahoo.com

Happy Crafting!

buggalcrafts a.k.a. melba

Fourth of July Paper & Foam Garland


4th of July Paper & Foam Garland

This garland designed for the kiddies to complete came about this past Sunday when I was drafted volunteered to help out during the Extended Care Session for preschoolers (a.k.a. Children’s Church) and had to come up with an emergency patriotic craft project for the Fourth of July.  I quickly came up with a project using items from our craft closet that takes about 20 minutes to complete.

The lesson to go along with this craft focused on the yellow ribbon symbolizing remembering our soldiers, the flag symbolizing our freedom, and the “God Bless America” & other religious “die cuts” our freedom of religion.  We talked about children in other countries who could not attend church at all or those who did so with the possibility of being arrested.

This would be a great kid’s rainy day craft project for any patriotic holiday or an easy patriotic holiday decoration by varying the paper and foam die cuts used (i.e.; George Washington or Abraham Lincoln silhouette, stars, etc.).

You can also make this as long as you want.  I choose to keep it short due to time constraints and to prevent tangling as the children carried it home.

Materials:

  • Paper Us Flags
  • Foam Yellow Ribbon
  • Red, White & Blue Ribbon
  • Red, White & Blue Pony Beads
  • Cord, Yarn or Other Stringing Material
  • Cross & Other Religious Stickers

Also Needed

  • Scissors
  • Glue Stick

Photo Tutorial

When you string the paper and foam items make sure the loops are in the front. To secure the paper or foam items in place tie a ribbon through the loop.

 

Thread the beads on the twine and secure them in place with a short piece of ribbon.

Glue a cross and a fish on the flags if desired.

The garland displayed on the wall.

Thank you for reading my post. I hope you enjoyed the tutorial. If you have any questions or something is not clear, please let me know so that I can improve the tutorial.

Please take a moment to leave a comment and rate this post. Really, please do – I’d love to hear from you.

Thanks again.

buggalcrafts a.k.a. melba

Flag Card


Flag Card

One of our church members recently made some flag cards for our kid’s group to complete for our mission focus for July – – – Pray 4 R Troops.  Her cards were all nicely cut with a Cricut machine BUT as I don’t have one and I can’t cut a straight line mine are a little less polished.

The children each wrote a special message and the pre-school children drew pictures.

We plan to send the cards along with Goodwill Boxes to a group of local soldiers that will be leaving for Afghanistan soon.   This gives us a little time to collect our goodies to send and for the boxes to arrive shortly after they do.  We plan on sending items the troops may have a hard time getting overseas.

Materials:

  • Flag Paper
  • Blue Cardstock
  • Red Cardstock
  • White “USA” Cardstock Letters
  • Mini Brads
  • Jingle Bells
  • Red, White & Blue Baker’s Twine
  • White Star & Heart Button
  • White or Parchment Cardstock

Also Needed

  • Silver Metallic Permanent Pen
  • Glue Stick
  • Adhesive Foam Squares

Mini Tutorial

  1. Tear a sheet of blue cardstock in half.  Tear around the edges so that it will fit on a 5×7 card or half sheet of cardstock.
  2. Tear the flag paper to fit in the blue cardstock.
  3. Tear a 2”x2” square of blue cardstock.  Dab on “stars” with the silver metallic marker.
  4. Punch holes with a pinpoint hole-punch in each corner of the blue square.
  5. Lay the blue square in the left top corner of the flag paper and then punch holes in the flag paper to line up with the other holes.  I had to mark the lower right with a pin and then punched a hole with a pen.
  6. Repeat with the blue cardstock.
  7. Join everything with mini brads.
  8. I added a red cardstock heart outline (punch a heart shape and then tear around it) to the bottom left of the flag paper with a mini brads stuck through a small heart button.
  9. Glue the flag paper down to the blue cardstock.
  10. Then glue everything to the front of the card.
  11. Tear a piece of red cardstock copying the shape on the card.  Measure to make sure the cardstock letters fit the piece and glue the letters down.
  12. Wrap the Baker’s Twine around the red cardstock piece and tie off leaving about 2” ends.
  13. Select a small star button that will not obscure the twine.  Thread the ends through the star button and double knot in the middle.  Tie small jingle bells on the ends.
  14. Use foam squares to secure the red cardstock to the front of the card so it is a little elevated.

 

Thank you for reading my post. I hope you enjoyed the tutorial. If you have any questions or something is not clear, please let me know so that I can improve the tutorial.

Please take a moment to leave a comment and rate this post. Really, please do – I’d love to hear from you.

Thanks again.

buggalcrafts a.k.a. melba

Preschool Sunday School Project: Miriam Watching Over Baby Moses


Preschool Sunday School Project: Miriam Watching Over Baby Moses

I looked at a lot of “Baby Moses” art projects preparing for a lesson this Sunday.  I particularly liked this one because it shows Miriam watching over baby Moses and THAT, not Moses as a baby, was the focus of the lesson!  I found this project on DLTK’s Bible Activities (and if you have never visited the site do so today, is totally FANTASTIC!).

You will note some differences in my project and the instructions because, as you already know, I JUST CAN’T follow directions to the letter!

Please visit the link above for instructions and a template for the figures.  The changes to the project I made are detailed below.

  1. First I used a paper plate colored blue instead of paper as a base. This provides a more stable base. However a paper base allows the project to be folded for storage. So both ways are great!
  2. Second, I cut around the figure of the baby and pasted it on a brown construction paper oval so Moses is in a basket. I also colored the center of the coffee filter blue and then colored the inside AND the outside of the coffee filter with three different colors of green with brown accents (Hey! “My” kids also had some Kentucky blue grass growing in their bulrushes!).
  3. Next I also cut around Miriam and to make some bulrushes for Miriam to hide in I cut rectangles from two colors of green construction paper. Fold a one inch tab in the green papers before cutting fringe to be the individual rushes so there is a base to glue to the plate.  Then, idea courtesy of one of my kids, I glued her between the two layers so Miriam is hiding IN the bulrushes!
  4. And lastly (and a last minute idea!), I added some glitter glue to the water for a little sparkle, because what preschool kid doesn’t like a little glitter?

Thanks for taking a look.  Please drop me a line and let me know what you think about this preschool Bible craft!

buggalcrafts a.k.a. melba

Cookie Cutters: Not Just For Cookies Anymore! Post # 26: Even More Cookie Cutter Ideas & Links Found On-The-Web


Cookie Cutters:  Not Just For Cookies Anymore! Post # 26: 

 Even More Cookie Cutter Ideas & Links Found On-The-Web

This is the next-to-the-last post I have planned for my series “Cookie Cutters: Not Just For Cookies Anymore”.  I hope you have enjoyed this series.  The last (?) post will be a wrap-up summarizing all the posts.  So if you missed any of the posts you’ll be able to catch up and not miss out on any of the really great crafts and ideas!  And I’ll let you know how the e-book idea works out!

Here are some more ideas and links to tutorials on using cookie cutters as a crafting material I’d like to share with you.  The tutorial links I have given are not the only links I found on the web, just in my humble opinion the best.  I’d love for you to share your favorite tutorial with me.

Please visit these blogs and join me in thanking these bloggers for sharing their crafts and ideas!  

I’ve also have started pinning each of the ideas I find on my Pinterest Boards.  I have two on “Cookie Cutter Crafting” currently, 100 Plus Ways To Use Cookie Cutters and “My Cookie & Cookie Cutter Crafts.   I’d love for you to follow these boards.   If you’d like to be a contributor to the 100 Plus Ways board send me an e-mail expressing your interest and include your e-mail address.  I will add you and you can add to the collection of ideas.   I’d really LOVE for this to become the “go to site” for unique cookie cutter uses.

P.S.: Here’s a great post on the history of cookie cutters by Karen’s Cookies tracing their roots going back over 2000 years. Fascinating!

Melba

Cookie Cutter Craft Ideas & Links to Blogs

Let me say one word about these blogs,”Wow!”.  There are several ideas I found on these sites that are new to me – sun art, floating candles, bird feeders!   I don’t intend to do tutorials on them right now but there are a few I am dying to try so keep an eye out for them on buggalcrafts sometime in the future (and I said it WAS almost the end of the series!  Did you really believe me?).

I have includes a brief description of each craft idea.  Please visit the links provided for details on the craft project or idea.

Bird Feeder Cookies: Create these cute bird seed ornaments to hang in the trees to feed the birds.

Clay Candle Holder: To make a clay candle holder, roll out a layer of air-dry clay and then cut four or five clay shapes using the same cutter. Layer them on top of each other, wetting each layer before adding another. Using a mini circle cutter, lemon juicer, etc. that is a little larger than the diameter of the candle you plan on using, cut the center out of the clay (leave the bottom layer intact). Check the fit with the candle being aware that the clay will shrink some as it dries. Allow your candle holder to dry and then is ready to paint as desired and use. And as a bonus, here’s a link to another cute cookie cutter clay idea.

Cookie Cutter Stamping: Make cookie cutter stamps from styrofoam and use the stamps to decorate solid color gift bags and wrap.

Cookie Cutter Soaps: Mix together 1 cup of soap flakes, a few drops of food coloring and 2 tbsp. of hot water. Press the mixture inside the cookie cutters and allow the cakes of soap to dry and harden for several days before popping out of the molds and using.

Cookie Cutter Honeycomb Candles: Make candles from honeycomb wax sheets and cookie cutters that can stand upright.

Cookie Cutter Floating Candles: Make floating candles from wax purchased wax or recycled from to-small-to-burn candles. Melt the wax following package directions (add color and scent if desired). Pour a thin layer of melted wax on a heavy plastic plate. Allow the wax set just slightly and then place the cutter in the wax. This will make a “mold” that will prevent the remaining wax from seeping under the cutter. Add the wick to the center of the cutter and pour the wax till it almost fills the cutter. Allow to harden completely then push the candle out of the cookie cutter “mold”. An alternative is to pour a layer of melted wax on an aluminum wrapped jelly roll pan. Allow to harden slightly then cut shapes with the cutter. Add a wick to the top of the candle and pour a layer of wax over the wick.

Cookie Cutter Stacked Shape Candles: Cut and stack cookie cutter shapes out of a slab of warm wax to make these unusual candles.

Collection of Cookie Cutter Ideas & Swaps:  Visit Craftster for some more great ideas about using cookie cutters. Simply search for “cookie cutters” and find craft projects, swaps and more!

Cookie Cutter Crayons: Use old, broken crayons to make big, cookie cutter shaped crayons for your kids. Make solid color or multi-colored crayons!

Cookie Cutter Crafts: This is a very nice post describing some cookie cutter crafts from kid’s crafts (like magnets) to items from the home (like the wax catcher below).

Cookie Cutter Candle Wax Catcher:   Check out this tutorial on making candle wax catchers.  To make it a “Cookie Cutter Craft, simply cut the clay with a mini cutter.   Roll out air drying clay with a rolling pin (or use an unopened soda can for an impromptu rolling pin) until the clay is about 1 inch thick and perfectly flat. Use mini cookie cutters to cut out shapes from the clay. Place a taper candle in the center of each shape and cut around the bottom of the candle using a sharp knife or use a ½ inch round cookie cutter to cut out a circle. Once the clay has hardened, slip the clay shape on a taper candle until it stops for a simple AND useful homespun embellishment.

Cookie Cutter Decorating, Not Your Typical: Here are some inexpensive suggestions that aren’t just “cookie cutter decorating”! There are some great ways to display your vintage or favorite cookie cutters. I found these ideas on several sites but this link is to my favorite site.

  • Plate Rail Display: Display your favorite cutters on plate rail molding. Hang a single piece or stack them to make cookie cutter “shelves”. Use small nails if needed to keep the cutters in place.
  • Cookie Cutter Border: Display your cutters by mounting them in the place of a wallpaper border.   Mount single cutters every four to six inches   around your kitchen walls.  Another way to make a decorative cookie cutter border is to string cutters together with torn fabric strips making a garland. Another alternative is to stamp or stencil a cookie cutter border using the cutters themselves or  stamps made from potatoes or sponges. Still yet another way to create a cookie cutter border is to decoupage cookie cutter die cuts around the room. Some examples: Stamp animal cookie cutter shapes around a child’s room.  Tie hearts and star cutters together to make a county border for your kitchen.  Share your ideas in a comment.
  • Cabinet knobs: Replace the current knobs on your kitchen cabinets with outline cutters.
  • Curtain Tie-Backs: For a primitive effect slip a cookie cutter onto each curtain tie back. Or make your own tie back by tying a cutter to raffia or ribbon and tie the curtain back.  How about mounting a cutter on a plain metal hook type tie back?
  • Window Decorations: Suspend several in each window from a thin strand of wire or ribbon.
  • Cookie Cutter Wall Display: Tie a torn fabric strip on each cutter as a bow and mount them directly to the wall with straight pins in a pleasing pattern.
  • Cookie Cutter Counter Display: Fill a gallon size jug with your favorite or vintage cookie cutters. Mix copper, colorful plastic, and metal for visual impact. Or use a quart size jar to display tart molds. Use a round tart mold in the place of the flat lid. Secure with a Mason jar ring.
  • Window Shade or Blinds Pulls: Use mini cutters as a pull tag on a window shade or blinds. This also works for a light or fan pull.
  • Curtain Rod Finales: Glue cookie cutters on the end of curtain rods.
  • Cookie Cutter Candle Centerpiece: Place a cookie cutter on a pretty plate, set a colored votive candle in the middle of the cutter. Scatter decorative accents like fresh or dried floral materials, clay “cookies”, buttons, beads, or pebbles around the cutter. Take care to not use flammable materials if votive will be lit.
  • House Plant Pokes: Glue onto short dowels to make plant pokes for a cute country kitchen accent.  Or how about dressing up a plant for a new mother gift by using mini baby related cutters?
  • Wallpaper Cookie Cutter Die Cuts: Use a cookie cutter to cut wallpaper shapes for home decor. Decoupage these on wooden canisters, candles or other decorative accents.
  • Curtain Weights: Sew mini cookie cutters along the edge or hem of a kitchen curtain to help it hang straight as well as adding a decorative accent.
  • Cookie Cutter Chandelier: Spray paint and glitter cookie cutters. Tie to ribbons and hang from the ceiling, chandelier or light fixture, etc. to create holiday atmosphere.

Cookie Plate: When giving a plate of cookies during the holiday season, or anytime!, add a finishing touch to make the gift truly unique. Attach a seasonal cutter (or two) along with a recipe card so the recipient can make more of your cookies any time they like. To make a decorative, disposable plate simply punch holes around the edge of a paper or foam plate. Then thread ribbon or trim through the holes and tie in the ends in a bow.

Garden Stakes: Make these cute stakes to mark your garden rows or dress up your flower beds.

Holiday Wreath: Make a delightful “Sweet Treat” Holiday Wreath for your kitchen door with cookie cutters and baking items. Tie on miniature or regular size baking utensils such as a whisk, wooden spoon, measuring cups & spoons, etc. Add candy canes and cinnamon sticks and then finish it off with a gingham bow. This wreath can serve as a “gift bag” when presenting baking supplies to a favorite niece or friend. Tie on the cutters (copper ones are especially nice) and other items with raffia or ribbon so they can be easily removed. Add a few cut-out decorated cookies wrapped in cellophane and a copy of the family recipe as a special finishing touch.

Miscellaneous Uses: Here are a few other uses I found around the net.

  • Use as a pattern to cut non-slip shapes for bathtub grips.
  • To hold small items for organization place several large outline cookie cutters in a drawer.  Glue in place if needed.

Martha Stewart’s Cookie Cutter Ornaments: Cookie cutters make great ornaments for your Christmas tree or wreath. They also work equally well for other seasons such as Valentine’s Day. Click here for the tutorial of the ornaments I made.

More Than Cookies; 8 Easy Cookie-Cutter Crafts: Here are eight more crafts with cookie cutters.

Round Cookies Without a Cutter: Don’t have a round cutter in the size you need?  This is a great tutorial on making uniformly round cookies without a cookie cutter.

Sewing & Needlework: There are tons of craft projects using cookie cutters as templates. Here are a few.

  • Use cookie cutters to trace patterns for embroidery or other stitchery work.
  • Use a cookie cutter as a template to create fabric shapes and attach them to sewing projects with iron-on fusible webbing. Stitch around the shapes with contrasting thread if desired. Make denim patches for jeans, shapes for quilt blocks, shapes for appliqué projects and more!
  • Use a cutter as a stencil with fabric paint on a t-shirt or tennis shoes.

Sugar Craft Cake Catalogue: This on-line catalogue also features some great ideas of “things to do” with cookie cutters. Plus they have some great baking items for sale!

Ten Crafts To Make With Cookie Cutters: This wonderful blogger gives ten great non-food uses for cookie cutters.

Tips on Using a Cookie Cutter: These are some great tips on how to use a cookie cutter on this blog including a really great idea for making cookie shaped bird feeders.

Tips on How to Cut Perfect Cookies: Some really great tips on using a cookie cutter! You will find tips on choosing a cutter and how thick to roll the dough using size of the cutter as a measure. Click here for an earlier post in the series with tips my mother, grandmother and great-aunt taught me when I learned to make cut-out cookies.

Zoo Trip: This is a great post with tips for making a zoo trip more memorable from food to crafts. This would be a great birthday party idea or even a school field trip for young children.

Thank you for reading my post. I hope you enjoyed this post and the “Cookie Cutter” series.  If you have any questions or if something is not clear, please let me know so that I can make any improvements needed.   

Please take a moment to leave a comment and rate this post.

Thanks again.

buggalcrafts a.k.a. melba

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